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Kids discover agriculture through UAPB program

Kids discover agriculture through UAPB program

PINE BLUFF, Ark. –  "AgDiscovery" is a two-week summer outreach program to help students learn about careers in animal science, veterinary medicine, agribusiness and plant pathology.

Participants, ages 14-17, live on UAPB’s campus and learn about agricultural science from university professors, practicing veterinarians and professionals working for the U.S. government. Students chosen for AgDiscovery participate in hands-on labs, workshops, field trips and other activities. The program is sponsored by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, a division of the U.S.

EPA looking to give out grants to address health, environment issues

EPA looking to give out grants to address health, environment issues

UNDATED -- The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 6 office in Dallas is accepting grant applications for $100,000 in funding to support projects designed to educate and enable communities to understand and address local health and environmental issues.

These grants are available in Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas.

Eligible applicants from non-profit, faith-based and tribal organizations working in the community of the proposed project are encouraged to apply.

EPA Region 6 will award four grants of $25,000 to support projects that address a community's local environmental issues through collaborative partnerships.

Vesper choir gives community concert

Vesper choir gives community concert

PINE BLUFF, Ark. - The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB) Vesper Choir will present a community concert at Dermott Elementary School Cafetorium, located 525 East Speedway.  The concert will take place Sunday, Feb. 27 at 3:30pm.  The Dermott community and surrounding areas are invited to attend this free public event.

The UAPB Vesper Choir is under the direction of Dr. Michael J. Bates, Professor of Music and Interim Chair of the Music Department.  He is assisted by Dr. Heidi Gordon, Vocal Instructor and Assistant Choir Director.  Rehearsal and performance accompanists are Dr. Andre Strydom and Ms. Julia Buckingham.

ANHC adds 140 acres to parks

ANHC adds 140 acres to parks

The Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission recently added 140 acres to Poison Springs State Forest Sand Barren & Oak-Pine Forest Preserve. This addition brings the natural area’s total acreage to 740. Located in Ouachita and Nevada counties, Poison Springs is jointly managed by ANHC, The Nature Conservancy, and the Arkansas Forestry Commission. Click here to read more about our latest acquisition.

Coffee House in Rockland Dec. 28

Coffee House in Rockland Dec. 28

Camden Conference - Join a discussion group on Tuesday mornings from 9:30 am to 11:30 am for some free-wheeling conversation covering a multitude of topics. Every 4th Tuesday, Peter Muth joins facilitator Bill Newman for a discussion of globalization.

This ongoing discussion group has continued to thrive for four years. A core group of a dozen or so sometimes swells to eighteen or more individuals who drop in for some free-wheeling conversation covering a multitude of topics. Politics, government, public policy, and current events are usually the focus. Open at no cost to CSC members. New members welcome.

Facilitator William Newman holds a BA from Brooklyn College and an MLS from Columbia University. He continued graduate study in philosophy and history at the New School for Social Research and at Cornell University. Before retiring, Bill was a librarian at various universities in the U.S. and Canada.

McCollum-Chidester house adds to historical richness of city

Camden has several houses that are immersed in history, many of them preserved, like the McCollum-Chidester House, built around 1847.

During the Civil War, the home served as headquarters for Union General Frederick Steel. The Battle of Poison Springs took place during this time.

The first occupant who built the house was Peter McCollum, who was a local merchant. The house held many ‘firsts’ for the area, including a large iron cookstove and one of the first sewing machines, which still sits inside the house.

The second owner, John Chidester, ran a mail-carrying business and was considered a spy by the Union because he allegedly looked through government mail to help the Confederacy.

Today, the Ouachita County Historical Society owns the house and uses it for its headquarters, but it is also a museum. The furniture inside the house was purchased from two of Chidester’s sons in 1963. The museum is located at 926 Washington Street.