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Blood donations needed to respond to emergencies

Blood donations needed to respond to emergencies

 

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (Jan. 15, 2013) — Like the emergency room of a hospital, the American Red Cross must be prepared to respond to patient emergencies with blood products 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. Through the dedication of blood donors, the Red Cross can be prepared day in and day out, no matter when or where blood is needed.

 

Readily available blood helps save the lives of people like David Zien, who was on his way home on his motorcycle when the SUV in front of him lost control during a lane change and flipped onto its side, sending Zien nearly 350 feet. He was transported by helicopter to a hospital, where he received 32 pints of blood. Today, Zien says he attributes much of his survival to the generosity of blood donors.

 

All blood types are currently needed. For more information and to make an appointment, visit redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS.

 

Red Cross hosts blood drive

Red Cross hosts blood drive

PINE BLUFF, Ark. – The American Red Cross will be running a blood drive at 1610 West 42nd Street (near the hospital) Monday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. For more information call (870) 536-6657 or visit their website.

Schools, Health Department offer flu vaccines for K-12

Schools, Health Department offer flu vaccines for K-12

(LITTLE ROCK) —The Arkansas Department of Health (ADH), the Arkansas Department of Education (ADE) and local school districts statewide are again offering the seasonal flu vaccine to school children in grades K-12 beginning the week of October 8. School clinics will be going on for the next several months.

Seasonal flu vaccine is not required for children to attend school, but it is highly recommended.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Academy of Pediatricians (AAP) recommend everyone aged 6 months and older receive a seasonal flu vaccine every year.  Seasonal flu causes children to miss school and their parents to miss work.   If you have insurance, the ADH will ask your insurance company to pay for the cost of giving the vaccine.  If you do not have insurance or your insurance company does not pay, the shot will be no charge to you.

UAPB hosts bone marrow drive Sept. 27

UAPB hosts bone marrow drive Sept. 27

PINE BLUFF, Ark. - Every day, thousands of patients with leukemia, sickle cell anemia, and other life-threatening diseases hope for a marrow donor who can make their transplant possible. Patients are most likely to match someone who shares their heritage. Yet out of the 9 million members on the Be The Match Registry® of potential marrow donors, only 650,000 are African American. Because Africans migrated all over the world, there is greater diversity within the African American population than other racial and ethnic groups. So African Americans can have a harder time finding a match than those of other heritages.

The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB) has joined with the National Marrow Donor Program to help change that trend. This partnership will be celebrated with a Be the Match kick-off assembly for the Thursday, September 27 at 11:00 a.m. in the J.M. Ross Theatre of the Hathaway-Howard Fine Arts Building.

UAMS report: Blacks at 'significantly higher' risk of death from cancer, HIV

UAMS report: Blacks at 'significantly higher' risk of death from cancer, HIV

Health Status of African-Americans Detailed in  UAMS College of Public Health Report

LITTLE ROCK – Mortality rates of African-Americans were significantly higher than those of Caucasians for most cancers, HIV and homicide, but lower for motor vehicle crashes and suicide, according to a recent report compiled by the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) Fay W. Boozman College of Public Health.

That’s just one of many findings detailed in a joint study focusing on the health status of African-Americans in Arkansas compiled by UAMS and supported by the Arkansas Minority Health Commission (AMHC), the Arkansas Center for Health Disparities and the Arkansas Prevention Research Center. The full report can be found here: www.uams.edu/coph/reports/ or www.arminorityhealth.com/reports_updates.html.

UAMS’ receives $7.9M to expand caregiver training

UAMS’ receives $7.9M to expand caregiver training

LITTLE ROCK – The Arkansas Aging Initiative in the Donald W. Reynolds Institute on Aging at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) has received $7.9 million from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation to provide new opportunities for the elderly to stay in their homes.

The grant will allow the expansion of the Schmieding Home Caregiver Training Program to four more Arkansas cities – Fort Smith, Little Rock, Hot Springs and El Dorado. The program, developed at the Schmieding Center for Senior Health and Education in Springdale, already is in Jonesboro, Pine Bluff, Texarkana and West Memphis thanks to a 2009 Reynolds Foundation grant.

The program offers educational opportunities for those who want to care for older adults preferring to stay in their own homes.